Rehabilitation of the Twee River Catchment | WWF South Africa

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Rehabilitation of the Twee River Catchment

Globally there is a heightened awareness of the importance of healthy freshwater systems and water as a critical resource, however there is also an acknowledgement of the serious threats facing these systems. South Africa’s freshwater systems are under pressure due to human impact and climate change. The Western Cape province of South Africa has been identified as one of the areas that could potentially be hardest hit by climate change impacts (Midgley et al. 2002).

The Olifants- Doorn River (ODR) falls within the Greater Cederberg Biodiversity Corridor (GCBC) which is a landscape corridor that acts as key mechanism to adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Olifants- Doorn River (ODR) system is stressed due to impact of alien vegetation, water abstraction as a result of agricultural activities. These rivers are not only critical for water yield but also for the high levels of biodiversity that they contain. The ODR is regarded as a biodiversity hotspot with 10 of its indigenous freshwater fish species being endemic and threatened.

The project seeks to initiate the restoration of key areas in the ODR system through focused interventions around alien invasive species management, rehabilitation, awareness and better practice management.

Globally there is a heightened awareness of the importance of healthy freshwater systems and water as a critical resource, however there is also an acknowledgement of the serious threats facing these systems. South Africa’s freshwater systems are under pressure due to human impact and climate change. The Western Cape province of South Africa has been identified as one of the areas that could potentially be hardest hit by climate change impacts (Midgley et al. 2002).

The Olifants- Doorn River (ODR) falls within the Greater Cederberg Biodiversity Corridor (GCBC) which is a landscape corridor that acts as key mechanism to adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Olifants- Doorn River (ODR) system is stressed due to impact of alien vegetation, water abstraction as a result of agricultural activities. These rivers are not only critical for water yield but also for the high levels of biodiversity that they contain. The ODR is regarded as a biodiversity hotspot with 10 of its indigenous freshwater fish species being endemic and threatened.

The project seeks to initiate the restoration of key areas in the ODR system through focused interventions around alien invasive species management, rehabilitation, awareness and better practice management.

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