Species



Dr Jacques Flamand

 
	© Black Rhino Range Expansion Project
Rhinos are the first love of wildlife vet, Dr Jacques Flamand
© Black Rhino Range Expansion Project
Project Leader: Black Rhino Range Expansion Project

RHINOS are the first love of wildlife vet Dr Jacques Flamand, leader of the highly successful WWF/ Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife Black Rhino Range Expansion Project. While with the then Natal Parks Board, he was closely involved with the organisation’s rhino translocation programme, which was responsible for the down-listing of white rhino from “critically endangered” to “vulnerable”. Now with WWF, he’s helping to do the same for the critically endangered black rhino.
The WWF/ Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife Black Rhino Range Expansion Project aims to increase numbers of the black rhino population by increasing the land available on which they can breed. It does this by forming partnerships with landholders who have the potential to sustain significant black rhino populations, ideally of 50 or more.
Originally from France, Flammand studied veterinary surgery and medicine at Cambridge University, England, and Wildlife Management at Pretoria University.
“During my career I have worked extensively with rhinos. I would estimate that I've personally handled more than 2,500 rhinos so far. I was involved with the Natal Parks Board (now Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife) white rhino translocation programme which was responsible for the down-listing of white rhino from "critically endangered" to "vulnerable,” says Flamand.
 

African Rhino Manager

 
	© WWF-SA
Dr Joseph Okori heads up WWF International's African Rhino Programme
© WWF-SA
Dr Joseph Okori

Born in Australia and raised and schooled in Uganda, Dr Joseph Okori serves as the African Rhino Manager under the WWF-International Species Programme. His mandate is to ensure objective delivery of the Rhino Strategic Action Plan that aims to establish viable rhino populations across all the historical rhino ranges in Africa.

A Wildlife Veterinarian by profession, Okori served as the Principal Wildlife Veterinary Officer in the Department of Wildlife and National Parks under Ministry of Environment Wildlife and Tourism, in the Government of the Republic of Botswana. He was the Veterinary and Partnership coordinator at Uganda Wildlife Authority and a researcher under German Technical Services. He also built up experience through voluntary work with NGO’s.

“My versatile training and 15 years experience with a solid background in integrated wildlife conservation systems and functions has greatly enhanced my capacity to address conservation issues from a multi-disciplinary approach. The need to ensure that conservation is a competitive resource and sustainably utilized with a strong bearing on economic development and community involvement is my passion,” says Okori.